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Case Studies
Case Studies

Case Studies (325)

Tuesday, 20 December 2011 10:19

Youngsan Estuary, Korea

Written by Johanna

Youngsan Estuary, Korea

Main Contributors:

Johanna Yletyinen

Other Contributors:

Summary

Hypoxia in Youngsan Estuary is seasonal and moderate, but gradually increasing with time. It has caused benthic mass mortality and reduced fisheries. Recolonization of affected areas occurs but the community does not return to the structure it had before the hypoxic event.

Type of regime shift

Ecosystem type

  • Marine & coastal

Land uses

  • Fisheries

Spatial scale of the case study

  • Local/landscape (e.g. lake, catchment, community)

Continent or Ocean

  • Asia

Region

  • East Asia

Countries

  • Korea, Republic of (South Korea)

Locate with Google Map

Key References

  1. Lim H-S, Diaz R, Hong J-S, Schaffner L. 2006. Hypoxia and benthic community recovery in Korean coastal waters. Marine Pollution Bulletin 52, 1517-1526.

Citation

Johanna Yletyinen. Youngsan Estuary, Korea. In: Regime Shifts Database, www.regimeshifts.org. Last revised 2012-03-17 19:08:55 GMT.
Tuesday, 20 December 2011 09:57

Kamak bay, South Korea

Written by Johanna

Kamak bay, South Korea

Main Contributors:

Johanna Yletyinen

Other Contributors:

Summary

Hypoxia in Kamak Bay is seasonal and moderate, but gradually increasing with time. It has caused benthic mortality and reduced fisheries. Fauna recovers from the hypoxic events, although slowly.  

Type of regime shift

Ecosystem type

  • Marine & coastal

Land uses

  • Fisheries

Spatial scale of the case study

  • Local/landscape (e.g. lake, catchment, community)

Continent or Ocean

  • Asia

Region

  • East Asia

Countries

  • Korea, Republic of (South Korea)

Locate with Google Map

Key References

  1. Lim H-S, Diaz R, Hong J-S, Schaffner L. 2006. Hypoxia and benthic community recovery in Korean coastal waters. Marine Pollution Bulletin 52, 1517-1526.

Citation

Johanna Yletyinen. Kamak bay, South Korea. In: Regime Shifts Database, www.regimeshifts.org. Last revised 2012-03-17 19:08:58 GMT.
Tuesday, 20 December 2011 09:39

Chonsu Bay, Korea

Written by Johanna

Chonsu Bay, Korea

Main Contributors:

Johanna Yletyinen

Other Contributors:

Summary

Hypoxia in Chonsu Bay is moderate but gradually increasing with time. It is seasonal and develops in summer. Hypoxia has resulted in benthic mortality and reduced fisheries.  

Type of regime shift

Ecosystem type

  • Marine & coastal

Land uses

  • Fisheries

Spatial scale of the case study

  • Local/landscape (e.g. lake, catchment, community)

Continent or Ocean

  • Asia

Region

  • East Asia

Countries

  • Korea, Republic of (South Korea)

Locate with Google Map

Key References

  1. Lim H-S, Diaz R, Hong J-S, Schaffner L. 2006. Hypoxia and benthic community recovery in Korean coastal waters. Marine Pollution Bulletin 52, 1517-1526.

Citation

Johanna Yletyinen. Chonsu Bay, Korea. In: Regime Shifts Database, www.regimeshifts.org. Last revised 2012-03-17 19:09:03 GMT.
Monday, 19 December 2011 15:20

Tomoe Cove, Japan

Written by Johanna

Tomoe Cove, Japan

Main Contributors:

Johanna Yletyinen

Other Contributors:

Summary

Fish farming in Tomoe cove began in 1973. The organic pollution of the bottom water has caused dramatic changes in fauna and decline of benthic communitites. Bottom water hypoxia has resulted indisappearance of benthic animals. The defaunated areas have been recolonized during autumn.

Type of regime shift

Ecosystem type

  • Marine & coastal

Land uses

  • Fisheries

Spatial scale of the case study

  • Local/landscape (e.g. lake, catchment, community)

Continent or Ocean

  • Asia

Region

  • East Asia

Countries

  • Japan

Locate with Google Map

Key References

  1. Tsutsumi H, Kikuchi T, Tanaka M, Higashi T, Imasaka K, Miyazaki M. 1991. Benthic faunal succession in a cove organically polluted by fish farming. Marine Pollution Bulletin 23, 233-238.

Citation

Johanna Yletyinen. Tomoe Cove, Japan. In: Regime Shifts Database, www.regimeshifts.org. Last revised 2012-01-12 10:12:24 GMT.
Monday, 19 December 2011 15:04

Suo-Nada, Japan

Written by Johanna

Suo-Nada, Japan

Main Contributors:

Johanna Yletyinen

Other Contributors:

Summary

Strong stratification is formed in the western Suo-Nada during summers, causing hypoxic water mass to develop near the bottom. Aquaculture industry has been strongly affected by the hypoxia, e.g. during the summer of 1988 about 95% of the oystersdied.  

Type of regime shift

Ecosystem type

  • Marine & coastal

Land uses

  • Fisheries

Spatial scale of the case study

  • Sub-continental/regional (e.g. southern Africa, Amazon basin)

Continent or Ocean

  • Asia

Region

  • East Asia

Countries

  • Japan

Locate with Google Map

Key References

  1. Senjyu T, Yasuda H, Sugihara S, Kamizono M. 2001. Current and turbidity variations in the western part of the Suo-Nada, the Seto Inland Sea, Japan: a hypothesis on the oxygen-deficient water mass formation. Journal of Oceanography 57, 15-27.

Citation

Johanna Yletyinen. Suo-Nada, Japan. In: Regime Shifts Database, www.regimeshifts.org. Last revised 2012-01-12 10:02:39 GMT.
Monday, 19 December 2011 14:45

Seto Inland Sea, Japan

Written by Johanna

Seto Inland Sea, Japan

Main Contributors:

Johanna Yletyinen

Other Contributors:

Summary

Seasonal hypoxia in Seto Inland Sea has caused mortality both in benthos and fish species.

Type of regime shift

Ecosystem type

  • Marine & coastal

Land uses

  • Fisheries

Spatial scale of the case study

  • Sub-continental/regional (e.g. southern Africa, Amazon basin)

Continent or Ocean

  • Europe

Region

  • East Asia

Countries

  • Japan

Locate with Google Map

Key References

  1. Imabayashi H. 1986. Effect of oxygen-deficient water on the settled abundance and size composition of the bivalve Theora lubrica. Bulletin of the Japanese Society of Scientific Fisheries 52, 391-397.

Citation

Johanna Yletyinen. Seto Inland Sea, Japan. In: Regime Shifts Database, www.regimeshifts.org. Last revised 2011-12-19 15:20:22 GMT.
Monday, 19 December 2011 14:31

Osaka Bay, Japan

Written by Johanna

Osaka Bay, Japan

Main Contributors:

Johanna Yletyinen

Other Contributors:

Summary

The area surrounding Osaka Bay has a population of more than 10 billion people. Both domestic and industrial wastewater is released in the Osaka Bay. One of the indirect results of the anthropogenic pollution is hypoxia. Benthic fauna is strongly influenced by the human impact, for instance ostracods have become scarce probably due to hypoxia.

Type of regime shift

Ecosystem type

  • Marine & coastal

Land uses

  • Fisheries

Spatial scale of the case study

  • Local/landscape (e.g. lake, catchment, community)

Continent or Ocean

  • Asia

Region

  • East Asia

Countries

  • Japan

Locate with Google Map

Key References

  1. Yasuhara M, Yamazaki H. 2005. The impact of 150 years of anthropogenic pollution on the shallow marine ostracode fauna, Osaka Bay, Japan. Marine Micropaleontology 55, 63-74.

Citation

Johanna Yletyinen. Osaka Bay, Japan. In: Regime Shifts Database, www.regimeshifts.org. Last revised 2012-01-12 08:31:50 GMT.
Monday, 19 December 2011 14:22

Omura Bay, Japan

Written by Johanna

Omura Bay, Japan

Main Contributors:

Johanna Yletyinen

Other Contributors:

Summary

Hypoxia forms in the Omura Bay every summer and peaks in August. 

Type of regime shift

Ecosystem type

  • Marine & coastal

Land uses

  • Fisheries

Spatial scale of the case study

  • Local/landscape (e.g. lake, catchment, community)

Continent or Ocean

  • Asia

Region

  • East Asia

Countries

  • Japan

Locate with Google Map

Key References

  1. Akagi S, Hirayama F. 1991. Formation of oxygen-deficient water mass in Omura Bay. Marine Pollution Bulletin 23, 661-663.

Citation

Johanna Yletyinen. Omura Bay, Japan. In: Regime Shifts Database, www.regimeshifts.org. Last revised 2011-12-19 15:20:52 GMT.
Monday, 19 December 2011 14:13

Mikawa Bay, Japan

Written by Johanna

Mikawa Bay, Japan

Main Contributors:

Johanna Yletyinen

Other Contributors:

Summary

Mikawa Bay is one of the most eutrophic bays in Japan. Seasonal hypoxia has caused benthic mass mortality.

Type of regime shift

Ecosystem type

  • Marine & coastal

Land uses

  • Fisheries

Spatial scale of the case study

  • Local/landscape (e.g. lake, catchment, community)

Continent or Ocean

  • Asia

Region

  • East Asia

Countries

  • Japan

Locate with Google Map

Key References

  1. Suzuki T, Matsukawa Y. 1987. Hydrography and budget of dissolved total nitrogen and dissolved oxygen in the stratified season in Mikawa Bay, Japan. Journal of the Oceanographical Society of Japan 43, 37-48.

Citation

Johanna Yletyinen. Mikawa Bay, Japan. In: Regime Shifts Database, www.regimeshifts.org. Last revised 2011-12-19 15:21:26 GMT.
Monday, 19 December 2011 13:31

Lake Shinji, Japan

Written by Johanna

Lake Shinji, Japan

Main Contributors:

Johanna Yletyinen

Other Contributors:

Summary

Lake Shinji has seasonal anoxia. The lake is eutrophic; it has been suggested that the eutrophication began in 1940s when population in the area increased.

Type of regime shift

Ecosystem type

  • Freshwater lakes & rivers

Land uses

  • Fisheries

Spatial scale of the case study

  • Local/landscape (e.g. lake, catchment, community)

Continent or Ocean

  • Asia

Region

  • East Asia

Countries

  • Japan

Locate with Google Map

Key References

  1. Yamamuro M, Kanai Y. 2005. A 200-year record of natural and anthropogenic changes in water quality from coastal lagoon sediments of Lake Shinji, Japan. Chemical Geology 218, 51-61.

Citation

Johanna Yletyinen. Lake Shinji, Japan. In: Regime Shifts Database, www.regimeshifts.org. Last revised 2011-12-19 15:21:32 GMT.